/DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd"> Frequently Asked Questions About the Pollywog Nursing Pillow

Frequently Asked Questions about the Pollywog Nursing Pillow

How do I use the Pollywog?
How can I tell if my baby is the right height on the Pollywog for my particular size?
I've just had a Cesarean and don't want anything touching my abdomen. How do I use the Pollywog?
I'm still really large and can't seem to get the Pollywog close enough. How should I use it?
I'm just home from the hospital and nursing with the Pollywog seems awkward. Help!
I'm experiencing sore nipples. What am I doing wrong?
My newborn slides down Pollywog's angled surface. How can I prevent this?
Why is the Pollywog angled?
If upright is beneficial, why isn't the Pollywog's angle more severe?
I am using the Pollywog but my baby still spits up. Why isn't it working?
My baby seems too long for the Pollywog. Why isn't it longer?
My baby is becoming acrobatic - I can't keep him still while nursing!


Please note I refer to baby as a "he". I just happen to have sons!

How do I use the Pollywog?

Consult our how-to guide!

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How can I tell if my baby is the right height on the Pollywog for my particular size?

Every woman has a unique breast-to-waist proportion so what is the correct height for one woman may not be the correct height for another. Because of Pollywog's unique shape it is possible to obtain many different heights and find the correct one for most mother/baby pairs. To be sure baby is in the correct spot on the Pollywog hold baby as if you were nursing him without a pillow. Without adjusting baby, slide the Pollywog under him and as close to your body as possible. Baby's mouth should be slightly underneath your nipple. Now that you have the correct height, you may want to make a mental note of where baby's head rests on the Pollywog so you don't need to repeat this process each time you nurse.

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I've just had a Cesarean and don't want anything touching my abdomen. How do I use the Pollywog?

The Pollywog is perfect for women who have had Cesareans because it allows the use of the football/clutch hold without having to wrap anything around the waist which can put pressure on stitches.

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I'm still really large and can't seem to get the Pollywog close enough. How should I use it?

Try the football/clutch hold. In the football hold the Pollywog is beside you instead of across your lap. Or place the Pollywog across your lap but pull the higher corner further into your side, which will move the tail of the Pollywog away from your abdomen. Experiment a little but never compromise proper latch!

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I'm just home from the hospital and nursing with the Pollywog seems awkward. Help!

Since breastfeeding is the natural way to feed our babies, we often think it is a skill that will come naturally to us. Breastfeeding is a learned art. Many breastfeeding pairs need time to learn to work together effectively and effortlessly.

The most important thing you can do to ensure successful breastfeeding is to get the basics down. Please do some reading or take a course. However, since no book or class knows about your individual and unique needs, the best help is personal instruction with a real live baby.

La Leche League is a non-profit organization that provides support and information to breastfeeding mothers around the world. Its website, www.lalecheleague.org, has invaluable information on breastfeeding. You may also attend LaLeche League meetings in your community for additional support.

Once you are comfortable nursing, using the Pollywog should actually make the experience easier and more comfortable.

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I'm experiencing sore nipples. What am I doing wrong?

Sore nipples usually mean that baby is not latched on correctly. Be sure baby is latched onto your areola, not directly onto your nipple. Since only the top of your breast is visible to you this can be difficult to do. Try using a mirror or recruiting a spotter. Also check that baby is not too high or too low on the Pollywog since tugging your breasts up or down can also compromise proper latch.

Attend a La Leche League meeting or read through their material at www.lalecheleague.org for information on proper latching.

Meet with a lactation consultant. Make sure she is certified (the initials IBCLC should be after her name.) A lactation consultant is a healthcare professional with a focus on preventing and solving breastfeeding problems. At www.ILCA.org you will find an International directory of lactation consultants.

You may be hesitant to spend the money for individualized instruction, feeling that you should be able to figure this out on your own. I can only respond that if I had not taken that step, I would have given up nursing after 8 weeks. The amount of money I spent on one visit has been repaid tenfold by avoiding the costs of purchasing formula, bottles, etc. and the health benefits to my son and myself are immeasurable. The monthly cost of powdered formula alone can range from $90 to $130 per month for a newborn.

Nipples do not "toughen up" with time. If you are sore and do not seem to be improving daily, please seek help!

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My newborn slides down Pollywog's angled surface. How can I prevent this?

Although placing baby on an incline is better for his digestion, it can lead to sliding. Placing a rolled up cloth against baby's bottom should prevent him from sliding down. As he gets older and heavier this is less likely to occur.

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Why is the Pollywog angled?

Just as you wouldn't swallow liquid lying down, it can also be uncomfortable for baby. Now add to that an immature esophageal valve. Get the picture? It is estimated that between 40% and 65% of all babies experience some degree of reflux, or the spitting up of the stomach's contents, in the early months. This can be extremely uncomfortable for baby, not to mention an inconvenience for mom and dad. Newborn babies have enough adjusting to do without having to fight gravity to get food down.

Feeding babies in a semi-upright position can help them to empty their stomach contents into their intestines during feeds. This means less milk will remain in their tummies at the end of the feeding, and less is better as it relates to spitting up. The Pollywog is angled at approximately 23 degrees to give baby's tummy a head start digesting his meal.

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If upright is beneficial, why isn't the Pollywog's angle more severe?

Gravity may help food go down, but it makes it more difficult to keep baby on the Pollywog. For ease of use, the Pollywog is constructed at an angle that most of our sample moms preferred. If desired, it is extremely easy to adjust the Pollywog to a 30 plus degree angle.

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I am using the Pollywog but my baby still spits up. Why isn't it working?

Some amount of spit up in babies is normal because their esophageal valves are underdeveloped. If your baby is spitting up more than a mouthful or two of milk per feed, however, try adjusting the Pollywog to a 30 plus degree angle. Rest assured, nursing at 30 degrees, or even 23 degrees is reducing spit up over nursing baby flat.

While it is now believed that a great many babies have some degree of reflux in the early months, some babies have it worse than others. Fortunately there is much you can do to reduce spitting up. All babies can benefit from proper handling.

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My baby seems too long for the Pollywog. Why isn't it longer?

The Pollywog is designed to be compact enough to use within the confines of a rocking chair. When your baby was a newborn his entire body probably fit on the Pollywog. Now that he is longer his legs should simply hang off the end. Eventually, around 5-7 months in age, his bottom should rest on your lap and the Pollywog will support his upper body (and all that increasing weight!).

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My baby is becoming acrobatic - I can't keep him still while nursing!

Many babies go through a very gymnastic nursing phase once they learn to roll over. It can be particularly difficult to keep them stable on any nursing pillow. Try nursing baby on the Pollywog on his side in a tight rocking chair and wrapping his legs around your body. Always keep one hand behind his back to prevent him from rolling away from you. Be ready to break his latch should he quickly turn his head or you may end up with sore nipples!

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